Blog: About Therapy

March 16, 2017

Group therapy is ideal for addressing social difficulties and exploring one's relationship to other people. It can help to make conscious our habitual ways of relating to others and lead to new insights about our behaviour. Groups can also offer support between the members and it can be helpful to meet other people with similar difficulties. Dramatherapy offers a very safe and supportive group experience. The use of drama, play, story and imaginative ways of working can facilitate intimacy and may allow clients to access feelings and share thoughts, more easily than with talking therapy. No previous experience or skills are needed. You do not need to be 'good' at drama or even a confident or extrovert personality. Sessions are designed to allow each person to take part in a way that feels genuine and comfortable for them. It is not about performing, being an actor or brilliant improvisor. Sessions use games and play to explore group dynamics and develop trust and intimacy. When the gro...

March 9, 2017

Creative therapy sessions offer clients an imaginative method of working through feelings and difficulties. There will be space to talk and reflect as well as creative expression. No previous experience or skills are necessary. I will offer a variety of creative methods of therapeutic work such as image making, dream exploration, story making and traditional story work, and dramatherapy and play. The therapy is based on the theories of Analytical Psychology and C.G.Jung. Importance is given to unconscious expression through drama, art, play and dreams. I am not an analyst and do not analyse clients dreams or creative expression. I can help clients to give shape to their unconscious fantasies and ideas and this can provide a container for powerful feelings. Working on and observing the work together can help clients to reflect on their feelings and difficulties and lead to discoveries of the unconscious state. 

Elsewhere on my blog, I have written in more detail on some of the metho...

March 9, 2017

Adolescents and children who feel they are too old for play therapy may enjoy creative therapy sessions. Often this client group want to talk to the therapist and sessions may be used just for this. Teenagers in particular are often resistant to any activities that  seem 'childish' but may enjoy the opportunity for therapeutic image making or story work. I provide art materials and activities such as pictograms and life maps. I encourage young people to explore their difficulties imaginatively through the use of traditional stories and therapeutic story making. Some young people enjoy the use of board or card games as these provide a framework for exploring rules and boundaries as well as an outlet for competitive or aggressive feelings. The game is a non-threatening activity that can be carried on while talking to the therapist about more vulnerable feelings. 

March 9, 2017

I use play therapy with children (usually under 12) and young people with learning disabilities and/or autism. Children (and people with learning delays) find it difficult to explain verbally how they are feeling or difficulties they are having. They may not consciously know what they are experiencing or understand their feelings. When they are allowed to play, children will naturally explore their inner world and much information about their feelings and difficulties can be observed. A traumatised child may concretely act out what has happened to them but there are also more symbolic representations of the emotional state. For example, a child who experiences adults as controlling, may place fences around the toy animals and then play at helping the animals escape. 

With some children I may be able to ask questions or comment on their play. With other children, I may engage with them through the play - taking on a character and joining in with what is enacted. Some children respond to...

March 9, 2017

Dreams contain helpful information from the unconscious and I encourage clients to write down their dreams. It can also be healing to draw or paint images from them. It can be helpful to explore a dream or an image from a dream in therapy. I am not an analyst and do not analyse dreams for clients but can work creatively with dream material. In group work it can be useful to enact a dream, allowing the dreamer to direct the enactment and to observe the dream again consciously. In group or individual work the client may like to try taking on a role or image from the dream and exploring this with the therapist. This work can help to make the content of the dream more conscious and lead to new insights. For example, a dream may have struck the dreamer as overwhelmingly negative or frightening but in exploring the images with the therapist or group, more positive themes may be discovered. 

I do not publish client's dreams. All images pictured were made by me. 

March 9, 2017

One way of working imaginatively with emotions and difficulties is to create images. This can be done by drawing, painting, making a collage or modelling in clay/plasticine. The image may represent a feeling state or be an imaginative representation of a problem or life situation. Images may also be taken from dreams. You do not need to be 'good' at art or to create 'perfect' pieces. Finding an image for an emotion or difficult situation can help to create some distance from the state and allow the client to look more objectively at the experience. Making the image allows the unconscious to emerge and often the image contains information that the client was not aware of. Making the image can be healing in itself but it is also useful for gaining more information about the unconscious situation. The image gives the client something concrete to see and to keep and it can act as a container for powerful feelings. The characters or scenes that are created could then be used as the starting...

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© 2017 Rebecca Beynon